About your Search

20121027
20121104
STATION
CSPAN 14
MSNBC 9
MSNBCW 9
CSPAN2 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
FBC 1
WRC (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 44
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
happened here, where so many experts in the field of environmental science have suggested that what is happening with these severe weather systems is becoming more frequent, as a result of climate change? >> well, martin, governor romney hasn't said a whole lot about a lot of things recently. you know, folks asked him 14 times yesterday, whether he was going to -- whether he wanted to get rid of fema. the last thing he heard or the last thing i remember hearing from governor romney on climate change was, he was questioning the science of climate change. and this is the same person who, when he was governor the first two years, was one of the leaders of reggie, the state consortium of governors, who wanted to do something about greenhouse gas emissions. two years later, he pulls out of it, as he was ramping up his run for president, the first run for president in 2008. so i think, you just -- he's been on every side of this issue, so the latest incarnation is that governor romney has questioned the science behind climate change. >> but also, john, i remember mr. romney's speech at th
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
of man-made global warming is a hoax. >> the science is bad. >> unproven science. >> that has yet to be proven and i highly doubt it's going to happen any time soon. >> still a scientific theory that has not been proven. >> cenk: that's the media. that's the republicans. when you turn to the democrats i wish i had good news for you. but president obama hasn't been that much better in his results. now he was recently on mtv kind of like candy crowly, he views it as a niche-type-of-topic. >> obama: we're not moving as fast as we need to. this is an issue that further generations, mtv viewers are going to have to be dealing with, even more than the older generation. this is a critical issue. there is a huge contrast in this campaign between myself and governor romney. i'm surprised it didn't come up in one of the debates. >> cenk: here's how it could have come up, if you brought it up. did you notice, you mtv viewers i guess you care about this because you'll be around when things get really bad. although things are getting bad now. and he said he has a much different record than mit
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
of the social science research institute and a co-organizer of the research is here today. susan, can you please stand to be recognized? thank you. [applause] we also made a pledge to educate the university community about ethics. it's one thing to know the rules, regulations, and policies; it's another thing to create a culture where every employeements to do the right thing the first time every time. through training and awareness building efforts, we're trying to help people understand the how, when, where, and why of reporting. i assure you that penn state takes this commitment very seriously. that's not a glib promise. to prove it, we stepped up efforts in compliance. like most universities, penn state has dozens of compliance professionals. they're responsible for ensuring research funds are appropriately used, they monitor the nca compliance, the financial reporting, conformity to federal laws covering privacy rights and crime reporting, and they administer regulations related to the health, welfare, and safety of those on campuses including our patients. what we've discovered, however, i
is sort of the science of the campaign. the obama campaign has its ground game down to precise numbers, who they have to turn out where, they're spending so much time and money figuring this out. that's science. the romney campaign is passion, energy, they're coming on, their campaign seems a little more excited. part of that's the nature of being a challenger versus an incumbent running a re-election. depending on which city you're in, boston or chicago, you come out with two different -- both make really compelling cases for themselves. the polls are tight enough that either one could be totally not spinning and believing it, but who knows? >> who knows? >> tom brokaw, just final thoughts in the final days of the campaign, how much should the events matter? then you've got the science of the campaign muddled by the storm. >> well, if nothing happens that is unexpected between now and then, the scenario is going to be does the romney wave override the obama ground game and getting out the vote? the romney people have been counting on what happened with reagan, as you know, in 1980. di
science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> what i can't promise you is that the federal government will be working as closely as possible with the state and local officials and we will not quit until this is done. >> we're going to box these things up in just a minute and put them on some trucks, and then we're going to send them into i think it's new jersey is a site that we've identified that can take these goods and distribute them to people who need them. >> oh, it's hard out there for a presidential candidate who is utterly irrelevant to the massive relief effort president obama is running in the aftermath of this week's historic storm. because the desperate and shameless romney campaign believes it cannot win the election without winning ohio, team romney pushed their poor candidate out onto a stage in ohio yesterday because the storm was still in progress in some states and the death count was climbing in new york and elsewhere. traditional political decency dictated that mitt romney not be caught campaigning yesterday. and so team romney hastily rewrote a campaig
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> it's hard out there for a man named mitt this week. we have some very, very silly video of mitt romney. next. in "the rewrite." ♪ [ crowd cheering ] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ that's the sound of car insurance companies these days. here a cheap, there a cheap, everywhere a cheap... you get it. so, what if instead of just a cheap choice, you could make a smart choice? like, esurance for example. they were born online and built to save people money from the beginning. it's what they've always done. not just something they cheap about. that's insurance for the modern world. esurance. now backed by allstate. click or call. >>> what i can promise you is the federal government will be working as closely as possible with the state and local officials and we will not quit until this is done. >> we're going to box these things up in just a minute and put them on some trucks, and then we're going to send them into i think it's new jersey is a site that we've identified that can take these goods and distribute the
to cut college tuition in half for the next decade. 100,000 math and science teachers in the next 10 years. [applause] we talk about jobs, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on. own a home, not red. have a decent school to send your child to. -- own a home, not rent. have a decent school to send your child to. helps send them to college. help your parents when they get older. that is why we are creating new manufacturing jobs, ted double exports. change the tax code, of four companies that come home, not those that go abroad. -- reward companies that come home, not those that go abroad. trained to million people over the next three years at community colleges. working with businesses to make sure students can finish school and go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we will continue to cut oil imports. in half by 2020, producing more american made energy. oil, clean coal, natural gas. those will create 600,000 new jobs. wind, biofuel, solar. we are already requiring automobiles to double their mileage by 2025. that alone will save $1.70 trillion at the pump a
is committed to hiring 100 and thousand new science and technology teachers in our schools. committed to cutting the rate of inflation cut in half and committed to the student loan program. [applause] the old student loan system works like this. the federal government pays the bank a fee to make loans and the guaranteed 90% worth of loans. the new system works like this. under that old system, we dropped to 16 in the world with our young people with college degrees. it is a recipe for disaster. we cannot afford to be 16th in the world. what do the president and congress do? they passed laws to change the system. the government sets aside a loan reserve saying these are the ones eagle for loans. starting next year, everyone in the country gets one of these loans will have the absolute right to pay back as a low fixed percent of their income. think about this. [applause] what that means is nobody ever has to worry whether they cannot pay their loans. if he get out of college and you want to go teach in a small town in ohio or the salaries are low, you can do it anyway for a few years be
people so they can get decent jobs and start growing again. to invest in science and technology and research. that's a better economic plan than one more round of tax cuts spending by a 22% cut on on education, science, and technology. it is bad for youngstown state, and obama's plan is better for the future of america. obama's education plan is better for the future of america. he is committed to hiring 100,00 0 new science, technology, and math teachers. committed to cutting the rate of inflation of college costs in half and to the student loan reform program, the single most important thing nobdody knows about. this alone justifies his reelection if you believe in the future. the old student loan system worked like -- the federal government paid the banks to make loands and guaranteed 93% of the loans. the new system -- under that old system, it meant we dropeped to 16th in the world in college degrees. a perscription for disaster. almost every job is created by someone with a degree. we can't afford to be 16th in the world. so what did the president and congress do? what did
. that is why we commit to cut college tuition in half for the next decade. 100,000 math and science teachers in the next 10 years. [applause] we talk about jobs, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on. own a home, not red. have a decent school to send your child wito. rent. a home, not have a decent school to send your child to. change the tax code, of four companies that come home, not those that go abroad. -- reward companies that come home, not those that go abroad. working with businesses to make sure students can finish school and go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we will continue to cut oil imports. in half by 2020, producing more american made energy. oil, clean coal, natural gas. those will create 600,000 new jobs. wind, biofuel, solar. we are already requiring automobiles to double their mileage by 2025. that alone will save $1.70 trillion at the pump and 12 million gallons -- barrels of oil over that time. the will level the playing field for the middle-class. because whenever the middle class is given a chance, they have never ever let their country d
to cut college tuition in half over the next decade. we committed to hire hundreds of science and math teachers over the next years. when we talk about the job, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on, own a home, not rent, have a decent school to send your child to come and be able to help send them to college, take care of your parents when they get older and save enough money that your children will not have to take care of you. that is why we are going to create new manufacturing jobs, change the tax code, reward companies that come home not those that go abroad. two million people, two million americans with the skills they need over the next three years at community colleges, working with businesses to ensure that when people finish school they can go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we're going to produce more american made energy, oil, clean coal, natural gas. alone, those will create 600,000 new jobs in 10 years. wind, solar, biofuel. we have already required automobiles to double their mileage. that alone will save 1.7 trillion dollars at the pump a
, favors republicans. this is not rocket science. to the extent that voting in florida is a debacle, it's one made by design. the ballot in florida is ten pages long. and with fewer days to vote, you get really long lines. but that's the way it goes in florida now. leading up to the election, florida republicans cut the time for early voting in half. so now floridians stand in long lines. they pass new restriction on registering voters so thousands fewer new voters signed up. and the governor has tried to purge the voter rolls. in south florida and palm beach county, 30,000 ballots were printed wrong. clerks have been copying what the voters marked on to new ballots that can fit into the tabula tabulating machines. dozens asked for absentee ball the lots and still haven't gotten them because they screwed up the ballots. the situation is worse in broward county where people have waited for weeks for absentee ballots. you can say that florida's election is another debacle in the making were it not already a debacle right now. and it is. joining us is joy reid. she's an msnbc contributor w
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >> all right. everybody, five days until the election and here is the latest snapshot on the economy. the private sector added 158,000 jobs in october according to the adp report today. also released today weekly jobless claims, 363,000 in the latest week, that's still a high number, seems to be the new normal, you might call it the new normal if you like excluding the two unusual reports earlier this month, leading to the government jobs report. and last month, a surprise drop in the unemployment rate. that reported 8:30 eastern tomorrow morning and you'll have it hereof course, it will be the last big report before the election. question, would it swing voters either way? right now, it's a dead heat. and the latest poll from fox news have the candidates tied. 46-46. and that's where it stands. look at this, these pictures may look familiar to some of our viewers, gas lines, and this is a lot worse than in the 1970's, this is a common scene in new york and new jersey right now. and many stations don't have power,
at the science of shopping with consumer dos and don'ts. >> dpoork. >> is there really a science to shopping for big-ticket items. >> a new study out of brigham young university and emorie university, if you're shopping for a big-ticket item like a big-screen tv, you shouldn't focus on the price. people who did spent 50% more. you're much better off thinking about what attributes do i want this product to have, whether it's a diamond ring or a big-screen tv, how big do i want it to be? what kind of resolution do i need it to have? do i want it to be a smart tv and then you can find one of those with all those attributes at the lowest price, works better. >> seems like the best of those things with those attributes would have the biggest price, is that necessarily true? >> not necessarily in items like big-korean tvs where we're seeing a lot of them under $1,000. >> let's talk about how to go about it. starting with popular books and something you call save on where we get great deals. >> we're going to break you some great deals. these come from retail me not and led us to those deals. the f
, schools give a break to students who major in math and science and those are most needed for florida's job market and undergrads studying political science, they have fewer job prospects in the state. >> alisyn: lady liberty. >> cool. >> alisyn: the statue's 126 anniversary and the celebration opening up to the public after a year long renovation and 30 million dollar project including remodeling the staircase to make it easier for visitors to climb and to climb, that was tough. and 26,000 more people visit each other. >> you climbed up and only made it up to the commissar i. >> alisyn: i was exhausted. >> clayton: can i get a coffee? and they put an elevator in there for handicapped individual who never before had a chance to go up and see a portion of the statue of liberty. today it could be open until it's closed later today by the federal government because of-- and meanwhile we have been talking over the last month what happened on september 11th of this year in libya. of course, our ambassador, a member of the embassy staff and two former navy seals were killed. jennifer griffin had
a bunch of stuff out today, the political science research which i'm very skeptical of. i would say for an incumbent president you have to do something. there's a lot of risk. there's a lot of potential for making a mistake. on a more simplistic level, i don't think if you're an incumbent you want people cranky when they go to the polls. it's not deep analysis, but it could be important. counterbalancing that, when people want the government to actually do something and do it well, they are much more likely to trust democrats in that circumstance. >> sure. >> the overall impact of the storm on the election is un unknowable. obama looks leader-like and presidential in the situation. he's part of the narrative of the storm, but then you pointed out, we're damaging early voting which is critical to the president's strategy. it becomes this situation like the president gets to look like a calm, strong leader in a crisis. that's the way some people read it. other people say the storm is obama's faumt and it proves he's weak. whatever way i see it, you see it that way. >> one problem for
. we don't even know how the satellite system works. we don't know a damn thing about science. put us in charge. to which i say hell, no! all right. now, when we come back, one of the guys who was in charge was michael brown. you remember brownie, heck of a job. he will be on the show. he's got a unique criticism of the president. he says that president obama reacted too fast to this storm. that should be a very interesting conversation when we come back. >> brownie you're doing a heck of a job. the fema director is working 24/7. [ applause ] >> cenk: we've got plenty more elbows for the last one came from. we have another one end at the of the show. try to guess this ononononononononononononononononononononononononononononononon >> cenk: we're getting our first look inside the tunnels under the east tunnels. the lirr. it has been flooded and as you can see it is a disaster area. literally. and how they even get the trains rolling again or how soon they will is, of course, very much an open question. and
.i.h., the national science foundation, so i would take issue with the fact that, you know, the republic of texas is making it all on their own. they're getting substantial benefits from federal research and development dollars. which is fine. i don't have any problem with that at all. but to benefit from the oil industry in such a profound way is a unique situation. we don't have that situation every y -- everywhere. but texas does benefit from nasa, from the national science foundation and the national institutes of health. that's helped spur their economy as well. >> congressman, gary on twitter wants me to ask you, why didn't obama stick his neck out for the nonunion workers who lost their peppings in the auto bailout. can you talk that out? >> that's an urban legend. we are working, nart brown and i are working very hard to help the seven or eight splinter unions that didn't end up doing as well as the u.a.w., the iue crferings wa which had contracts essential to the development of the new general motors. but this is not a union-nonunion issue. there were seven or eight different unions that
they are to vote. high turnout favors democrats. low turnout favors republicans. this is not rocket science. to the extent that voting in florida this year is a debacle, it is a man-made debacle. it is a debacle by design. in some towns the ballot this year in florida is ten pages long. and filling it out takes longer, and with fewer days to vote, well, yeah, magic, you get really long lines. but that's the way it goes in florida now. leading up to the election, florida republicans cut the time for early voting in half. so now floridians stand in long lines. they pass new restriction on registering voters so thousands fewer new voters signed up. and governor scott has continued trying to purge the voter rolls in florida, challenging voter registrations in to the final weeks before the vote. in south florida and palm beach county 30,000 absentee ballots were printed wrong. clerks have been copying what the voters marked on to new ballots that can fit into the tabulating machines. dozens more voters asked for absentee ballots and still haven't gotten them, days much about the election. becaus
reason. i don't know whether that's because how computer science is conducted in universities or i'm not with larry summers that i think it's all social and not physical. and on the other financial literacy. well, we didn't address that here because we're only looking at earnings and not at income from financial assets. we purposely made that decision to focus on earnings. as it is, that's an issue for the top 20% of the country. 93% of the value of all financial assets, includes pensions and retirement accounts and savings accounts and stocks and bonds all financial assets which is to say that every asset in the economy except homes. that's -- and art and gold or whatever. are held by the top 20% of the country. but financial literacy in the top 20%, i think does have an effect on ultimate in come. would it be a good idea to have greater financial literacy across income distribution? absolutely, and it would be better to figure out a way and there are lots of ways to do it for average people to accumulate assets other than their own homes. >> baby bonds, but that is another subjec
. others say it is pretty unusual. i was wondering what the record and science say about the but secular course this storm is taking. >> what makes every storm unique is a combination of things, the time of year, strength of the structure in magnitude and size. sandy is unique in a number of ways. it is certainly not common for a system to come in at this strength. but if you look back in history, tropical cyclones have come up the east coast many times in the past. the whole east coast is vulnerable to storm surges and hurricanes. look at isabel in 2003 that came in a little bit further south and had all the storm surge. it has taken a different path, going it in a different direction than this one is. every storm is unique. this is not 100 percent unprecedented, but certainly not common to have a system of this magnitude coming from this direction at this time of year, and what makes this nearly unprecedented and very unusual is the transition to oppose best tropical cyclone and all the different hazards you have in one time. >> i think this is the only time i know of with the hurrican
this election will look at what went wrong and what went right, after this. it is science and they are very talented people. a lot of times they are very accurate. i will say that, it you are for one candidate or another, there is your own emotions that play into this sometimes, if so you will see a poll that maybe is not favorable to you and your party and sometimes your emotions can play into it. for the most part, particularly with these averages, they are generally accurate. host: we did a segment yesterday about understanding polls during the campaign season. if your interested, go to c- span.org and we have the pew research director talked about how and why polls are done. now to thomas in little home, texas, republican -- in little elm. caller: i want to know, for everyone out there, i know people that go to college, whether their parents paid for it or day paige ford themselves, they're very proud they went to college. i cannot figure out why obama, and his wife, have hidden their records and sealed them. guest: well, i don't want to comment directly on that, necessarily, but i will
and there is some political science research showing that just having that field office,, on the ground in a certain community does increase your share of the vote. but then there's a qualitative difference as well. the obama campaign, it's almost like a starbucks or a mcdonald's, a franchise operation, where every office is very much the same, it's all controlled by headquarters, they're all working off the same game plan, right down to every single office has what looks like this sort of nice grassroots touch, a poster on the wall that says, i support the president because, and then everybody has handwritten in their reasons they love obama underneath. every single office has that same poster, so it's very standardized, very controlled, very disciplined and they're all working off the same plan. romney actually does not have his own ground game at all. it's the r.n.c., the republican national committee that is operating the ground game for him and that's not necessarily a disadvantage, but it means he doesn't have that standardization, he is much more at the mercy at the strength of the r.n.c. and
. and rather than vesting in solar we'll invest in signs science and research and by 2020 we will achieve north american energy independence. [applause] we'll make trade work for america. we'll open more markets for american agriculture and we'll hold accountable any nation that doesn't play by the rules. i'm going to stand up for the rights and interest of american workers and employers. and we're going to grow jobs by make ug america the best place for business and manufacturers. this will mean updating regulations while lowering deductions and closing loopholes and make it clear that unlike the current administration, we actually like business and the jobs that business creates. [applause] and finally, as we create more opportunity, we'll make sure that our citizens have the skills they need. training programs will be where the people live and schools will put the interest of our kids and teachers and parents above the interests of the teacher's unions. when we do those five things, this economy is going to come roaring back. we're going to create 12 million new jobs in four years, we'll see
undecided voters. so what should they do? larry sabato is the professor of political science at the university of virginia. he joins us now. we have a week left. i think we just got note that president obama will resume campaigning, according to aides, in nevada, colorado, wisconsin, tomorrow. is this a smart thing? is this what he should be doing? >> well, look, the storm has served as a circuit breaker on the campaign. it's like we have to restart all over again and the candidates, both of them, have to whip up enthusiasm again among the base. it's amazing how quickly people's attention will turn to something else. i think everybody can do that. everybody knows the election is next tuesday. the stakes are very high. so look, we have to get back to campaigning. there is no question about it. it's big election. >> eric: what about for mitt romney? he stepped aside. he said, i'm not going to campaign. he even stopped fundraising. said send the money to fema or emergency assistance instead. when is it time for mitt romney to really start bearing down again on the campaign? >> w
happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. humans -- sometimes life trips us up. and sometimes, we trip ourselves up, but that's okay. at liberty mutual insurance we can "untrip" you as you go through your life with personalized policies and discounts when you need them most. just call... and speak with a licensed representative about saving on your policy when you get married, move into a new house... [crash!] or add a car to your policy. don't forget to ask about saving up to 10% when you combine your auto and home insurance with liberty mutual. security, coverage, and savings. all the things humans need to make our beautifully imperfect world a little less imperfect. call... and lock in your rate for 12 months. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? >>> let's look at some of the powerful photos come in from the east coast. a gas station, look at this gas station attendant sits in front of a pump as he fills can after can with gasoline. in brooklyn, new york, thousands of people stand in line for buss into manhattan. many comm
in electric auto and solar company we'll invest in energy science and research. to make discoveries that can actually change our energy world. and by 2020 we will achieve north american energy independence. [applause] we will make trade work for america. we'll open more markets for american agriculture and products and services and we'll findly -- finally hold accountable any nation that doesn't play by the rules. look, i'm going to stand up for the rights and interests of american workers and employers and we're going to grow jobs by making america the best place for job creatorsing for entrepreneurs, for small business. this will mean upkating and reshaping regulations to encourage growth by lowering tax rates while lowering deductions and bay making it clear from day one that unlike the current administration we like business. and the jobs that business creates. and timely, as we create more opportunity, we'll make sure that our citizens have the skills they need to succeed. training programs are going to be shaped by the states where people live and schools will put the interests of our
is there for a specific reason and not in manchester, 20 miles to the north. there is a lot of science to this. there is a lot of polling that goes into it. it is very strategic. we have had a lot of candidates here for the primary. we have had a lot of exposure to them. certainly, voters here are knowledgeable about who these people are after going through the primary. the different debates that go on. host: neil levesque, executive director of the new hampshire institute for politics, thank you. there are four electoral votes at stake in new hampshire, and it is considered a tight race. it's history of being a swing state continues as it is on our list. our conversation continues about the battle states, the battleground state of new hampshire with -- our competition continues about the battleground states of new hampshire. kathy sullivan is the chairwoman of the democratic party. she tried to us from manchester this morning. if i could begin with the "washington post" piece. republicans say that romney's team is far ahead of what senator john mccain had in place for years ago. but the exten
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)